Omaha
 
There are several variations of poker that players can delve into…and Omaha High is one of many players’ favorites. Just like with Hold ‘em, you can play Limit, No Limit and Pot Limit games. In fact, in many respects, Omaha is similar to Texas Hold ‘em. In the case of this tutorial, we’ll use a Limit game as an example.
 
Starting the Round - As with Hold ‘em, Omaha High starts out with a specified dealer, who plays last on each round. In Internet and casino games, the dealer is identified by a “button,” which moves left around the table, hand after hand. Also like Hold ‘em, a small blind and big blind are posted at the beginning of the round to get the pot rolling. The small blind is to the left of the button, the big blind to the left of the small blind.
 
Dealing the Cards - Here’s where Omaha differs from Texas Hold ‘em. When cards are dealt, each player gets four cards. Of course, you’re still trying to form the best winning poker hand. Then bets are placed. As in Hold ‘em, you can call, raise, check or fold. Many Limit games limit players to three or four raises during each round. But once the play gets down to two players (“heads-up”), the raises are unlimited. So even a Limit game could become No-Limit!
 
The Flop - As in Hold ‘em, three community cards are turned up in the center of the table. All players can use these cards. Creating your best hand must be comprised of two hole cards (cards in your hand) and three community cards (cards on the board). Another round of betting takes place. Call, raise, check or fold.
 
The Turn - A fourth community card is placed in the center of the table, and another round of betting takes place. Call, raise, check or fold.
 
The River - A fifth community card is placed in the center of the table, and another round of betting takes place. Call, raise, check or fold.
 
Determining a Winner - Once the final bet is called by all remaining players, cards are revealed to see who has the best hand comprised of two hole cards and three community cards. In the rare case that all five cards on the board are better than any combination of each player’s hand and the board, all remaining players split the pot.
 
 
"Poker is a game of people... It's not the hand I hold, it's the people that I play with."
"Look around the table.  If you don't see a sucker, get up, because you're the sucker."
"Nobody is always a winner, and anybody who says he is, is either a liar or doesn't play poker."
"They anticipate losing when they sit down and I try my darndest not to disappoint one of them."